1. 22:18 22nd Jul 2014

    Notes: 1482

    Reblogged from sdzoo

    Tags: for my brotherliceham

    image: Download

    sdzoo:

Scientists explain the orangutan’s unique approach to problem solving with this example: If a chimpanzee is given an oddly shaped peg and several different holes to try to put it in, the chimp immediately tries shoving the peg in various holes until it finds the correct hole. But an orangutan may stare off into space or even scratch itself with the peg. Then, after a while, it offhandedly sticks the peg into the correct hole while looking at something else that has caught its interest.
Photo by Bob Worthington

    sdzoo:

    Scientists explain the orangutan’s unique approach to problem solving with this example: If a chimpanzee is given an oddly shaped peg and several different holes to try to put it in, the chimp immediately tries shoving the peg in various holes until it finds the correct hole. But an orangutan may stare off into space or even scratch itself with the peg. Then, after a while, it offhandedly sticks the peg into the correct hole while looking at something else that has caught its interest.

    Photo by Bob Worthington

     
  2. It is love. I will have to hide or flee.

    Its prison walls grow larger, as in a fearful dream.
    The alluring mask has changed,
    but as usual it is the only one.
    What use now are my talismans, my touchstones:
    the practice of literature,
    vague learning,
    an apprenticeship to the language used by the flinty Northland
    to sing of its seas and its swords,
    the serenity of friendship,
    the galleries of the library,
    ordinary things,
    habits,
    the young love of my mother,
    the soldierly shadow cast by my dead ancestors,
    the timeless night,
    the flavor of sleep and dream?

    Being with you or without you
    is how I measure my time.

    Now the water jug shatters above the spring,
    now the man rises to the sound of birds,
    now those who look through the windows are indistinguishable,
    but the darkness has not brought peace.

    It is love, I know it;
    the anxiety and relief at hearing your voice,
    the hope and the memory,
    the horror at living in succession.

    It is love with its own mythology,
    its minor and pointless magic.
    There is a street corner I do not dare to pass.
    Now the armies surround me, the rabble.
    (This room is unreal. She has not seen it)

    A woman’s name has me in thrall.
    A woman’s being afflicts my whole body.

    — Jorge Luis Borges, from The Threatened One

    (Source: violentwavesofemotion)

     
  3. Writing Workshop: Mailbag Edition - Intensifiers

    matchinacrocus:

    An excellent question from the mailbag:

    I have a writing question for you. I find myself often expressing things using “very” and “really”, that a thought is “very intriguing” or I found a story “really fascinating”. I’d like to think I have a more varied vocabulary, and yet instead of searching for a word to express the emphasis I’m adding with the “very” or “really” I’m simply using those. I guess my question then is, what does one do to decrease reliance on such adverbs? 

    I’ll answer this with a cooking analogy. 

    Salt is an indispensable ingredient. Used in moderation, it makes sweet things sweeter, cuts bitterness and turns up the volume on flavor.

    Intensifiers (e.g. very, really, extremely) are like table salt. 

    Ideally, salting the food is the cook’s task. (That’s you, writer.) Good ingredients and well-chosen seasoning—meaty nouns and verbs, delicately chosen adjectives, a pinch of perfectly placed punctuation—are your first priority. A balanced dish is seasoned judiciously: not to cover up faults in the ingredients or preparation, but to bring out the flavors that are already there. 

    If you have to add table salt after the fact, that implies a fault in the preparation—there’s not enough flavor to carry the dish. 

    On the other hand, a cook who over-salts a perfectly good dish insults the subtlety of the diner’s palate. Enough salt will mask mediocre food; too much will render it inedible. 

    If you’re trying to convey fascination, interesting is too mild. Very interesting is bland masked by table salt. Riveting is well-seasoned. Very riveting is over-salted. 

    If you’re bored of the words you always use, head for the cookbook. The thesaurus, used correctly, can be a gateway to better writing. You can also do a lot with the preparation: punctuation, syntax and context. Timing is everything.

    Here’s the bottom line. Chances are that if you’re using a lot of intensifiers, you’re either using lackluster adjectives in the first place, or you’re over-salting. Take a leap of faith. Delete all of your intensifiers and see what happens. I bet you won’t miss them. And if you do, try to improve the quality of your ingredients before you add them again.

    Happy writing!

    This is wonderful. I always love the Mailbag Edition.

     
  4. (Source: hanvictoria)

     
  5. 20:37

    Notes: 18081

    Reblogged from fairytalemood

    Tags: Cinderellafairy talesillustrations

    amoosebouche:

    I’ve been itching to share this for a while now. My last project was Cinderella, and since there’s already one version of Cinderella for Far Faria, I decided to do a Filipino version version just to mix it up. 

    You can download the app to read it here! 

     
  6. image: Download

    michaelmoonsbookshop:

A view of the astrological heavens of the ancients
1810

    michaelmoonsbookshop:

    A view of the astrological heavens of the ancients

    1810

     
  7. image: Download

    radivs:

'Zodiacal Light' by Sean Goebel
"Despite all the time I've spent under clear, dark skies, I've never clearly seen Zodiacal Light before. Until tonight."
"Zodiacal light is sunlight reflecting off dust in the inner solar system. It appears after sunset or before sunrise and forms a line in the sky in the plane of our solar system. The slight orange on the horizon is a tiny remnant of sunset."
"I'm currently staying at Hale Pohaku, the astronomers' village/visitor center on the side of Mauna Kea. It's at an altitude of 9,300 ft (2,800 m), and I hiked up a nearby cindercone to watch sunset. I will be observing on one of the Mauna Kea telescopes for the next several nights."

    radivs:

    'Zodiacal Light' by Sean Goebel

    "Despite all the time I've spent under clear, dark skies, I've never clearly seen Zodiacal Light before. Until tonight."

    "Zodiacal light is sunlight reflecting off dust in the inner solar system. It appears after sunset or before sunrise and forms a line in the sky in the plane of our solar system. The slight orange on the horizon is a tiny remnant of sunset."

    "I'm currently staying at Hale Pohaku, the astronomers' village/visitor center on the side of Mauna Kea. It's at an altitude of 9,300 ft (2,800 m), and I hiked up a nearby cindercone to watch sunset. I will be observing on one of the Mauna Kea telescopes for the next several nights."

     
  8. 15:33

    Notes: 1266

    Reblogged from aseaofquotes

    Tags: Jean-Paul SartreSartewriterswriting

    image: Download

    aseaofquotes:

— Jean-Paul Sartre

    aseaofquotes:

    Jean-Paul Sartre

     
  9. I was led into these thoughts, my dear Reynolds, by the beauty of the morning operating on a sense of Idleness - I have not read any books - the Morning said I was right - I had no idea but of the morning, and the thrush said I was right.
    — John Keats (letter to John Hamilton Reynolds, February 19th, 1818)
     
  10. 12:09

    Notes: 1243

    Reblogged from doctoruth

    designcloud:

    The Abyss Table by Duffy London

    This mesmerising table was first conceived by Christopher Duffy — and ultimately refined by the team at Duffy London — to represent a 3D geological map of an ocean floor. The Abyss Table makes use of contour lines, which are often used to denote topography in terrain maps, to render an island chain and ocean abyss.

    Contour lines can be thought of as workaround for the 2D limitations of paper maps, but Duffy instead relished these simplifications which have become iconic imagery for the field of cartography. He incorporates layers of wood to represent the land, and panes of glass for the water, in order to produce a 3 dimensional geographical model.

    (via Homeli)

     
  11. nataliedurmer:

    "I must continue to follow the path I take now. If I do nothing, if I study nothing, if I cease searching, then, woe is me, I am lost. That is how I look at it — keep going, keep going come what may. But what is your final goal, you may ask. That goal will become clearer, will emerge slowly but surely, much as the rough draught turns into a sketch, and the sketch into a painting through the serious work done on it, through the elaboration of the original vague idea and through the consolidation of the first fleeting and passing thought". [x]

     
  12. I shall reform the novel and capture multitudes of things at present fugitive, enclose the whole, and shape infinite strange shapes.
    — Virginia Woolf, Selected Letters (via thewreckageofmen)
     
  13. 07:05

    Notes: 653

    Reblogged from sdzoo

    Tags: *preens*the truth will set you freedoctoruth

    image: Download

    sdzoo:

Mirror mirror on the wall, who’s the prettiest peacock of them all?
By helenehoffman

    sdzoo:

    Mirror mirror on the wall, who’s the prettiest peacock of them all?

    By helenehoffman

     
  14. 05:23

    Notes: 58

    Reblogged from amandaonwriting

    Tags: Jess Walterwriterswriting

    image: Download

    amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Jess Walter, born 20 July 1965
Nine Quotes
When I’m deep in a novel, I don’t pay bills and I walk around in one shoe, drinking two-day old coffee, and calling my kids by the wrong names.
Without sounding overly sentimental about the process, I’d say trying to describe how you tend to conceive of a book is like describing how you tend to fall in love.
My desk is an antique with bookshelves built into the side. I’ve turned the drawer over to hold a keyboard. We live in a 100-year-old house, and I work in an apartment above the carriage house.
I pretty much drink a cup of coffee, write in my journal for a while, and then sit at a computer in my office and torture the keys. My one saving grace as a writer is that, if I’m having trouble with the novel I’m writing, I write something else, a poem or a short story. I try to avoid writer’s block by always writing something.
For me, movies and television are interesting because they are the dominant storytelling form of our time. My first love will always be fiction, and especially novels, but I’m a writer… I write poetry and essays and criticism and I’d love to write a whole play, and sometimes I even write scripts.
I think suspense should be like any other colour on a writer’s palette. I suppose I’m in the minority but I think it’s crazy for ‘literary fiction’ to divorce itself from stories that are suspenseful, and assign anything with cops or spies or criminals to some genre ghetto.
Forget being ‘discovered.’ All you can do is write. If you write well enough, and are stubborn enough to embrace failure, and if you happen to fall into the narrow categories that the book market recognizes, then you might make a little money. Otherwise, it’s a struggle. A gorgeous struggle.
Stories are people. I’m a story, you’re a story…your father is a story. Our stories go in every direction, but sometimes, if we’re lucky, our stories join into one, and for awhile, we’re less alone.
I think some people wait forever, and only at the end of their lives do they realize that their life has happened while they were waiting for it to start. 
Walter is an American author. He has written six novels and a collection of short stories. His has won many awards including the Edgar Allan Poe Award. Walter also writes screenplays and was the co-author of Christopher Darden’s 1996 best-seller In Contempt. 
Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

    amandaonwriting:

    Happy Birthday, Jess Walter, born 20 July 1965

    Nine Quotes

    1. When I’m deep in a novel, I don’t pay bills and I walk around in one shoe, drinking two-day old coffee, and calling my kids by the wrong names.
    2. Without sounding overly sentimental about the process, I’d say trying to describe how you tend to conceive of a book is like describing how you tend to fall in love.
    3. My desk is an antique with bookshelves built into the side. I’ve turned the drawer over to hold a keyboard. We live in a 100-year-old house, and I work in an apartment above the carriage house.
    4. I pretty much drink a cup of coffee, write in my journal for a while, and then sit at a computer in my office and torture the keys. My one saving grace as a writer is that, if I’m having trouble with the novel I’m writing, I write something else, a poem or a short story. I try to avoid writer’s block by always writing something.
    5. For me, movies and television are interesting because they are the dominant storytelling form of our time. My first love will always be fiction, and especially novels, but I’m a writer… I write poetry and essays and criticism and I’d love to write a whole play, and sometimes I even write scripts.
    6. I think suspense should be like any other colour on a writer’s palette. I suppose I’m in the minority but I think it’s crazy for ‘literary fiction’ to divorce itself from stories that are suspenseful, and assign anything with cops or spies or criminals to some genre ghetto.
    7. Forget being ‘discovered.’ All you can do is write. If you write well enough, and are stubborn enough to embrace failure, and if you happen to fall into the narrow categories that the book market recognizes, then you might make a little money. Otherwise, it’s a struggle. A gorgeous struggle.
    8. Stories are people. I’m a story, you’re a story…your father is a story. Our stories go in every direction, but sometimes, if we’re lucky, our stories join into one, and for awhile, we’re less alone.
    9. I think some people wait forever, and only at the end of their lives do they realize that their life has happened while they were waiting for it to start. 

    Walter is an American author. He has written six novels and a collection of short stories. His has won many awards including the Edgar Allan Poe Award. Walter also writes screenplays and was the co-author of Christopher Darden’s 1996 best-seller In Contempt

    Image

    by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

     
  15. Woolf often conceives of life this way: as a gift that you’ve been given, which you must hold onto and treasure but never open. Opening it would dispel the atmosphere, ruin the radiance—and the radiance of life is what makes it worth living. It’s hard to say just what holding onto life without looking at it might mean; that’s one of the puzzles of her books. But it has something to do with preserving life’s mystery; with leaving certain things undescribed, unspecified, and unknown; with savoring certain emotions, such as curiosity, surprise, desire, and anticipation. It depends on an intensified sense of life’s preciousness and fragility, and on a Heisenberg-like notion that, when it comes to our most abstract and spiritual intuitions, looking too closely changes what we feel. It has to do, in other words, with a kind of inner privacy, by means of which you shield yourself not just from others’ prying eyes, but from your own. Call it an artist’s sense of privacy.
    — 

    Joshua Rothman's New Yorker essay on Virginia Woolf’s idea of privacy is the best thing I’ve read in ages. 

    It rings especially poignant in the context of her own conflicted inner life, from her exuberant appreciation of the world’s beauty to her intense capacity for love to the deathly despair of her suicide letter.

    Do yourself a favor and read Rothman’s full essay here.

    (via explore-blog)